20 TIPS for Webcomic Beginners!

So you’re a big fan of webcomics, and you’re thinking about starting your own. Great! As Scott McCloud says, “there are no rules,” but here are 20 AMAZING TIPS that I’ve discovered and collected over the years that are sure to help any budding webcomic creator out of a bind or two.
1. IT’S THE INTERNET- it’s not like it’s professional or anything! Let’s face it, you’re publishing online because (and solely because) you couldn’t get published in any real and respectable medium, like the funny pages of a local newspaper. Don’t take yourself too seriously! Nobody else is going to anyway!
2. In the same vein, DON’T WORRY ABOUT QUALITY. Nobody expects good free things on the internet, and who are you to try and start a crazy, doomed-from-day-one tactic like that? It’s already well established that comics on the internet are fourth- or fifth-string players in a medium that’s really only for children anyway. Put out whatever quality work you can do in a short enough amount of time and the internet won’t mind one bit.
3. When choosing your art style, FEEL FREE TO COPY OTHERS. Do you really like what, let’s say, popular webcomic XKCD by Randall Munroe is doing? Why, there’s no reason you can’t do it too! Just doodle some stick figures on graph paper talking about love and computers and scan it in. Mr. Munroe, a smart man, knows that imitation is the highest form of flattery, and might even give you some of his money if you’re really lucky. But remember, you can copy ANYONE’s style. Everybody knows that nobody owns things on the internet anyway.
4. So you spent a good ten minutes on that first panel- wow! Now here comes the second panel and you have to start all over again. But wait! Since this is a digital medium, YOU CAN COPY AND PASTE ALL YOU WANT. It’s okay! People do it all the time, and who can blame them? Your readers, if they’re even smart enough to notice, will recognize that the valuable time you saved by using this handy shortcut probably served you for far better things! Just don’t forget to change at least some of the dialog!
5. Since you’ve got a comic, you’re automatically pretty hot shit, instantly in the leagues of Watterson and Eisner (don’t worry if you don’t know the names!). You probably keep a blog of rants about how the world keeps dragging you down, well, MAKE THE COMIC DEPENDANT ON THE BLOG! This will encourage readers to seek it out and read it! As an extra bonus, you can let the blog disappear after a few weeks and the comic won’t make as much sense by itself, which will encourage readers to check back every day just in case they miss something! Now that’s “drawing power” (pun intended!!)!
6. Speaking of blogs and drawing power, one thing you want to avoid at all costs is WARNING YOUR READERS OF DOWNTIME. If you’re going on vacation for two weeks, don’t make an announcement about it! Just stop updating those two weeks without a word and drop out of contact as much as you can. This will bring readers back for the first few days out of continual curiosity, giving you hits, and as an added bonus, will make you seem much more mysterious and cool in their eyes too. And when you start up again, they’ll be all the more glad to see you back! Triple yay!
7. You might have heard about the new fad in webcomics, known as RSS, which stands for “Random Subscription System.” RSS is a lot like the moon landing- celebrated, widely respected, but actually just a big hoax! DON’T USE RSS! Let’s face it, only hippies and dinosaurs actually use RSS, and it’s on its way out. Update your comic on your own terms and don’t let some soulless system take away all your rsspect.
8. Time to design a website. One of the most important things: DON’T HAVE THE COMIC ON THE FRONT PAGE. (And in fact, don’t make the link to the comic obvious at all!) This will elevate the suspense of the reader tenfold, as he tries to find where the link is! Throw in some red herrings in the form of graphics that say “New Comic: Click Here!” but don’t actually link anywhere! Your readers will go crazy for this added layer of interactivity!
9. Use a free comic host, such as DrunkDuck or SmackJeeves, and besides any changes I mention, STAY WITH THE DEFAULT LAYOUT THEY GIVE YOU AS MUCH AS YOU CAN. It’s default for a reason, people! People like it, it’s standard, it fits in the mold. You don’t want to stand out with something crazy that people aren’t used to and don’t understand! The default layouts are how webcomics SHOULD look and you should make yours look exactly like it as best you can.
10. Some other RANDOM WEB-DESIGN TIPS: Use a blaring, ugly background, so your reader’s eyes get diverted to and stay on the comic! If your comic is taller than the screen, only have the navigation buttons above it OR below it, but not both! Use an intentionally confusing drop-down archive system so readers will be forced to look at a bunch of your comics before they find the one they’re looking for! If you can, use complex, “page turn simulation” animation between pages to give the feel of a real book- don’t worry if it compresses your image a bit small or makes the page slow to load, the effect is SO WORTH IT!
11. I see a lot of comics with “About” pages for explanations, and I always shake my head and sigh. DON’T INCLUDE AN ABOUT PAGE. Your comic should speak for itself! If your comic needs some extra page of description, you’re doing something wrong. You don’t need an “About” page for Garfield, do you? Of course not!
12. Here’s a fun little trick I’ve found. After number 11, you may surprised that I say that “Cast” pages are a good thing! But here’s the thing… HAVE A CAST PAGE BUT DON’T UPDATE IT! Write “coming soon” under each character description and use the oldest art for them that you can find. Potential readers will be drawn in by the mystery of who these people may be and be extra motivated to read your comic to find out!
13. Now, I’m not going to give you tips on what to draw, since your story is your own thing. But if you’re looking for a winning premise, there are a few you can’t go wrong with. Try FOUR COLLEGE AGE KIDS WHO LIVE TOGETHER, or perhaps A GROUP OF FRIENDS WHO EAT PIZZA AND PLAY VIDEO GAMES. If you want to really amp it up, make the college age kids play video games! There are a lot of these out there and can be very successful. If you want to add a little spice to your own, though, try adding a TALKING ANIMAL!
14. You might be wondering about what font to use in the dialog, too. There are a bunch of great free fonts out there, but the thing is, you don’t need them. USE COMIC SANS. It has “comic” right in the name! This is what it’s meant for!
15. You might have heard that people make money off of webcomics, enough to make a living, and want to pursue that kind of thing yourself. No problem! With a webcomic, YOU ARE BASICALLY GUARANTEED TO MAKE MONEY, especially with the tips I’ve given you! Include a “Donations” link on your site, that’s all there is to it! Just put your comic up and sit back and watch it flow in. It’s like magic, and you will truly be amazed!
16. Another excellent way to make money is by selling advertising space on your website. On the internet, space is still limited, which means that space is money–so CRAM IN ALL THE ADS YOU CAN GET! X-rated ads pay especially well, and sometimes they’ll pay you extra if you let them use complicated scripts for crazy animations and videos! Don’t worry if it slows down the site a few fractions of a second, this money is WORTH it. Feel free to include pop-ups, too, especially in your archive! Your readers will understand that it’s vital to support your comics!
18. Here’s more of a warning about making money, that I see so many of my favorite comics doing anyway. Don’t make t-shirts! YOU ARE NOT A T-SHIRT SALESMAN, you are a wannabe cartoonist! If you start making t-shirts (or any product) off of your work, soon you’ll be making comics based specifically around the merchandise, and that’s when you’ve really sold out. Keep your integrity, in this case, it’s better than tainted funds.
19. Speaking of what you shouldn’t do, DON’T LINK TO/ACKNOWLEDGE OTHER WEBCOMICS! You are not advertising for them, at least not for free! Let them buy space on your site like everyone else, if they must. But remember, readers can only read so many comics on the internet. You don’t want to link them to one that they replace you with, do you? Of course not!
20. Finally, some closing words. DON’T TRY ANYTHING TOO CRAZY. There are times and places to experiment with new things, and let’s face it, the internet is not on that list. The internet is some serious business, not your personal playground for silly little comics experiments. Stick to what you know for webcomics, and don’t be afraid to stay with the good old basic black and white three panel gag a day format, just like in newspapers. It’s worked for them for over a hundred years, it can work for you too. Comics are meant to entertain, as well as make money for their creators, and it’s extremely important that you remember one thing: comics are not art. Pretend all you want, but that’s the happy fact that has kept us going so far. Don’t try and change it now!
Well, that’s about all I’ve got to say on webcomics, though maybe if I collect more tips I’ll have enough to make another one of these! I hope it really helped. Good luck on your endeavors, and remember to keep your day job!

So you’re a big fan of webcomics, and you’re thinking about starting your own. Great! As Scott McCloud says, “there are no rules,” but here are 20 AMAZING TIPS that I’ve discovered and collected over the years that are sure to help any budding webcomic creator out of a bind or two.

1. IT’S THE INTERNET- it’s not like it’s professional or anything! Let’s face it, you’re publishing online because (and solely because) you couldn’t get published in any real and respectable medium, like the funny pages of a local newspaper. Don’t take yourself too seriously! Nobody else is going to anyway!

2. In the same vein, DON’T WORRY ABOUT QUALITY. Nobody expects good free things on the internet, and who are you to try and start a crazy, doomed-from-day-one tactic like that? It’s already well established that comics on the internet are fourth- or fifth-string players in a medium that’s really only for children anyway. Put out whatever quality work you can do in a short enough amount of time and the internet won’t mind one bit.

3. When choosing your art style, FEEL FREE TO COPY OTHERS. Do you really like what, let’s say, popular webcomic XKCD by Randall Munroe is doing? Why, there’s no reason you can’t do it too! Just doodle some stick figures on graph paper talking about love and computers and scan it in. Mr. Munroe, a smart man, knows that imitation is the highest form of flattery, and might even give you some of his money if you’re really lucky. But remember, you can copy ANYONE’s style. Everybody knows that nobody owns things on the internet anyway.

4. So you spent a good ten minutes on that first panel- wow! Now here comes the second panel and you have to start all over again. But wait! Since this is a digital medium, YOU CAN COPY AND PASTE ALL YOU WANT. It’s okay! People do it all the time, and who can blame them? Your readers, if they’re even smart enough to notice, will recognize that the valuable time you saved by using this handy shortcut probably served you for far better things! Just don’t forget to change at least some of the dialog!

5. Since you’ve got a comic, you’re automatically pretty hot shit, instantly in the leagues of Watterson and Eisner (don’t worry if you don’t know the names!). You probably keep a blog of rants about how the world keeps dragging you down, well, MAKE THE COMIC DEPENDENT ON THE BLOG! This will encourage readers to seek it out and read it! As an extra bonus, you can let the blog disappear after a few weeks and the comic won’t make as much sense by itself, which will encourage readers to check back every day just in case they miss something! Now that’s “drawing power” (pun intended!!)!

6. Speaking of blogs and drawing power, one thing you want to avoid at all costs is WARNING YOUR READERS OF DOWNTIME. If you’re going on vacation for two weeks, don’t make an announcement about it! Just stop updating those two weeks without a word and drop out of contact as much as you can. This will bring readers back for the first few days out of continual curiosity, giving you hits, and as an added bonus, will make you seem much more mysterious and cool in their eyes too. And when you start up again, they’ll be all the more glad to see you back! Triple yay!

7. You might have heard about the new fad in webcomics, known as RSS, which stands for “Random Subscription System.” RSS is a lot like the moon landing- celebrated, widely respected, but actually just a big hoax! DON’T USE RSS! Let’s face it, only hippies and dinosaurs actually use RSS, and it’s on its way out. Update your comic on your own terms and don’t let some soulless system take away all your rsspect.

8. Time to design a website. One of the most important things: DON’T HAVE THE COMIC ON THE FRONT PAGE. (And in fact, don’t make the link to the comic obvious at all!) This will elevate the suspense of the reader tenfold, as he tries to find where the link is! Throw in some red herrings in the form of graphics that say “New Comic: Click Here!” but don’t actually link anywhere! Your readers will go crazy for this added layer of interactivity!

9. Use a free comic host, such as DrunkDuck or SmackJeeves, and besides any changes I mention, STAY WITH THE DEFAULT LAYOUT THEY GIVE YOU AS MUCH AS YOU CAN. It’s default for a reason, people! People like it, it’s standard, it fits in the mold. You don’t want to stand out with something crazy that people aren’t used to and don’t understand! The default layouts are how webcomics SHOULD look and you should make yours look exactly like it as best you can.

10. Some other RANDOM WEB-DESIGN TIPS: Use a blaring, ugly background, so your reader’s eyes get diverted to and stay on the comic! If your comic is taller than the screen, only have the navigation buttons above it OR below it, but not both! Use an intentionally confusing drop-down archive system so readers will be forced to look at a bunch of your comics before they find the one they’re looking for! If you can, use complex, “page turn simulation” animation between pages to give the feel of a real book- don’t worry if it compresses your image a bit small or makes the page slow to load, the effect is SO WORTH IT!

11. I see a lot of comics with “About” pages for explanations, and I always shake my head and sigh. DON’T INCLUDE AN ABOUT PAGE. Your comic should speak for itself! If your comic needs some extra page of description, you’re doing something wrong. You don’t need an “About” page for Garfield, do you? Of course not!

12. Here’s a fun little trick I’ve found. After number 11, you may surprised that I say that “Cast” pages are a good thing! But here’s the thing… HAVE A CAST PAGE BUT DON’T UPDATE IT! Write “coming soon” under each character description and use the oldest art for them that you can find. Potential readers will be drawn in by the mystery of who these people may be and be extra motivated to read your comic to find out!

13. Now, I’m not going to give you tips on what to draw, since your story is your own thing. But if you’re looking for a winning premise, there are a few you can’t go wrong with. Try FOUR COLLEGE AGE KIDS WHO LIVE TOGETHER, or perhaps A GROUP OF FRIENDS WHO EAT PIZZA AND PLAY VIDEO GAMES. If you want to really amp it up, make the college age kids play video games! There are a lot of these out there and can be very successful. If you want to add a little spice to your own, though, try adding a TALKING ANIMAL!

14. You might be wondering about what font to use in the dialog, too. There are a bunch of great free fonts out there, but the thing is, you don’t need them. USE COMIC SANS. It has “comic” right in the name! This is what it’s meant for!

15. You might have heard that people make money off of webcomics, enough to make a living, and want to pursue that kind of thing yourself. No problem! With a webcomic, YOU ARE BASICALLY GUARANTEED TO MAKE MONEY, especially with the tips I’ve given you! Include a “Donations” link on your site, that’s all there is to it! Just put your comic up and sit back and watch it flow in. It’s like magic, and you will truly be amazed!

16. Another excellent way to make money is by selling advertising space on your website. On the internet, space is still limited, which means that space is money–so CRAM IN ALL THE ADS YOU CAN GET! X-rated ads pay especially well, and sometimes they’ll pay you extra if you let them use complicated scripts for crazy animations and videos! Don’t worry if it slows down the site a few fractions of a second, this money is WORTH it. Feel free to include pop-ups, too, especially in your archive! Your readers will understand that it’s vital to support your comics!

18. Here’s more of a warning about making money, that I see so many of my favorite comics doing anyway. Don’t make t-shirts! YOU ARE NOT A T-SHIRT SALESMAN, you are a wannabe cartoonist! If you start making t-shirts (or any product) off of your work, soon you’ll be making comics based specifically around the merchandise, and that’s when you’ve really sold out. Keep your integrity, in this case, it’s better than tainted funds.

19. Speaking of what you shouldn’t do, DON’T LINK TO/ACKNOWLEDGE OTHER WEBCOMICS! You are not advertising for them, at least not for free! Let them buy space on your site like everyone else, if they must. But remember, readers can only read so many comics on the internet. You don’t want to link them to one that they replace you with, do you? Of course not!

20. Finally, some closing words. DON’T TRY ANYTHING TOO CRAZY. There are times and places to experiment with new things, and let’s face it, the internet is not on that list. The internet is some serious business, not your personal playground for silly little comics experiments. Stick to what you know for webcomics, and don’t be afraid to stay with the good old basic black and white three panel gag a day format, just like in newspapers. It’s worked for them for over a hundred years, it can work for you too. Comics are meant to entertain, as well as make money for their creators, and it’s extremely important that you remember one thing: comics are not art. Pretend all you want, but that’s the happy fact that has kept us going so far. Don’t try and change it now!

Well, that’s about all I’ve got to say on webcomics, though maybe if I collect more tips I’ll have enough to make another one of these! I hope it really helped. Good luck on your endeavors, and remember to keep your day job!

About these ads

July 3, 2009. Articles, Humor, Webcomics.

54 Comments

  1. Flash replied:

    Perfect!

    • starrydreamsky replied:

      Thank you so much I’m making a web comic this helped so much, can I ask you a question, what are mostly interesting about web comics? :)

  2. The Joy of Webcomics can’t find a cure for the summertime blues « The Webcomic Overlook replied:

    [...] offering tips for webcomic newbies! One of them is Hey! Look! Comics!, that offers 20 free tips for webcomic beginners. Use a blaring, ugly background, so your reader’s eyes get diverted to and stay on the comic! If [...]

  3. Dajs replied:

    Haha! I hope people don’t take this seriously, but it’s a good way to point out the status quo of the today’s webcomic scene, I’ve seen all these things done, and yeah, it can be annoying, ‘specially begging for donations.

  4. Mick Collins replied:

    Where’s #17?

  5. Bengo replied:

    This is the worst list of its kind I have ever seen. Which is a shame, because it seems well-intentioned.

    Do you know anything at all about comics, or the business of comics? So much of your offering is exactly backward or relentlessly ignorant that it represents a new low, long after I thought I had seen it all.

    • indigootter replied:

      Seriously? You consider yourself a writer and are unable to recognize sarca… OH! Hah! Good one.

    • Carly replied:

      lolstupid. it’s a joke. maybe the internet is serious fucking buisness.

  6. Mike replied:

    Advice we should all take to heart. It’s only a shame more people can’t appreciate these words of wisdom. I shall link to this valuable resource as soon as possible and tell all my friends so they may benefit also. Thank you Jason from everybody in ‘webcomics’.

  7. Bengo replied:

    OK, this went right over my head. Two people kindly wrote me and underscored your sarcastic tone. I had completely misread your article.

    I apologize. It’s actually quite clever and may hit the mark more accurately than the type of “serious” pieces I write from time to time.

  8. Brian Powers replied:

    That was Hee Haw funny. ;)

  9. Luke replied:

    Fantastic! I can think of a few more as well…

  10. peckinpaw replied:

    I especially like #2 ! :)

  11. Jesse Cline replied:

    this list is hilarious. I especially like the part “Just put your comic up and sit back and watch it flow in. It’s like magic, and you will truly be amazed!” LMAO

  12. Sen replied:

    I love this list.
    More people need to get the one about copy/paste.

  13. erik K replied:

    Is the missing #17 “when you’re stuck for a joke, have Jesus appear and say something funny?”. That is ALWAYS hilarious.

  14. Michael Ezra replied:

    More tips:

    21. Add an exclamation mark to the name of your webcomic! That’ll make your comic stand out from the rest, because no one else has ever thought of that! Even better, why not three exclamation marks!!!

    22. Never under any circumstances proofread your comic text before posting. If you’re a poor speller, are less than fluent in English, or have a learning disability, never get someone else to proofread. When readers correct your spelling or grammar, publicly humiliate them for being anal and insensitive. They’ll be sure to reward you with return visits and donations.

    23. As an alternative to disappearing from the Internet for weeks without notice (see Tip #6), post as much filler as you can. This should not consist of light-hearted, out of continuity strips, nor even rough sketches. Too much effort–it’s filler, remember. Instead, post photos of your cat (lolspeak caption optional) or your significant other/hired escort. That’s what your readers came by to see, after all.

    24. As an alternative to #22, post a long-winded excuse as to why you haven’t updated for weeks/months. Suggestions: “I have exams,” “My boyfriend/girlfriend/imaginary friend dumped me and I’m all depressed,” “I have the plague.” But be sure to tantalize your readers with “I’ll be back soon,” then disappear for another six months. Bonus points for cussing out readers who complain about downtime when they get the comic for free (and by the way, could they please make a donation?).

    25. Another sure-fire way to increase your traffic with minimal effort is to pick fights with other webcartoonists or reviewers. Deflect attention from your lazy copy-and-paste or third-rate manga technique by saying “At least I don’t do stick figures or sprites like Cartoonist X, LOL!!1one!”, and be sure to publicize your “total pwnage” of your rival. Link to negative reviews of your comic and urge your readers to troll the obscure forum or LiveJournal on which it was posted.

  15. The Gigcast » Blog Archive » Webcomic Wire - 9/4/09 replied:

    [...] Look! Comics! has a sarcastic list of tips for webcomic beginners. A word of caution: Successful people don’t seek [...]

  16. Nef replied:

    I am guilty of more than a few myself, but I am applying # 15 and as soon as the magic starts I will have so much money I won’t have to worry about anything else…

    Good one, btw.

  17. Yours Truly replied:

    Yet another tip
    #26 – Draw traffic to your website by leaving comments on webcomic related blogs and linking to your site. Don’t waste time on writing comments which actually relate to the content of the article – using the common template of “Hey, great post!” or “I really enjoyed this post, I bet you’ll also like my site at http://www.mycomics.com” will do the trick.

  18. Zon replied:

    27. Once you’ve set up a forum for your comic, forget it even exists. If people fill the threads with trolling, spam and obscene or gory images, that’s not your problem, and your readers surely won’t hold it against you.

    28. As an alternative, micromanage your forum by deleting all posts critical of your comic, no matter how civil, and banning the user. Strictly forbid users from recommending other webcomics (see #19). If your moderating style makes the Chinese government look permissive, you’re on the right track.

    29. Reward longtime readers with a sudden, unannounced and dramatic shift in the comic’s tone or genre. Example: if your comic is a goofy sex comedy about college roommates, recast it as a Victorian melodrama with numerous references to eighteenth-century German epistemology. In the unlikely event anyone complains, post a long rant about censorship and how misunderstood you are comme artiste.

  19. tweetics replied:

    #30. By no means should you use any social media to cross promote your comic. Jim Davis didn’t have a Twitter, and look where he got. Facebook/Twitter/Myspace/Friendster are fads best used by 14 year old’s who are obsessed with Miley Cyrus, do yourself a favor and avoid social networks altogether. People WILL find your comic eventually.

    #31. Consistant with #19, it is okay to be friendly with other Webcomic artists, but if you feel that you can get ahead by capitalizing on other creator’s success, do so (i.e. if another webcomic is doing well because there is a Lesbian in it, then make a lesbian character too…but make her more Lesbian-y, it is all about pushing the envelope).

  20. Tyler James replied:

    Great post!

  21. Jack Cayless replied:

    #32 As an artist, you are far superior to any and all of the groundlings that gaze upon your daily masterpieces, so never ever reduce yourself to replying to comments or e-mails. Not even a thank you. The swine that read your comic deserve nothing, and should be treated like the mere mortals that they are.

  22. The Webcomic Beacon | Beacon Newsflash – September 10th, 2009 replied:

    [...] News: ►Hey! Look! Comics! has an article about 20 helpful tips for beginning webcomickers, of which some may find extremely [...]

  23. HazMatt replied:

    #17. Remember, “you’re an idiot” is a perfectly acceptable punchline. Why bother crafting a gag when you can just have a character do or say something random and then have another character react with that little three-word gem.

  24. listo entertainment replied:

    excelent!
    i’ll spread the word!

  25. Michael Ezra replied:

    #33. Another tried-and-true webcomic gag is wacky, disproportionate violence for which the perpetrator never suffers any consequences. Two characters disagree on a video game’s quality? Have Character A smash Character B over the head with the console. Character has to wait twenty seconds longer while someone in line ahead of him counts out pennies? Duh! Blowtorch! It’s comedy gold when people get permanently crippled or killed over trivialities.

  26. Sin D'Angelo replied:

    This made me laugh XD Excellent work!

    The sad thing is that some new web comic artists will probably take this seriously.

    I actually use ComicDish, which is a free web comic hosting site that offers a standard template. It’s amazing how EASY it is to use basic html to give your page it’s own unique flavor without having to reduce yourself to mediocrity.

    • Mishihime replied:

      ComicDish has made an effective community and host. i agree.

      #34 Make sure you vary your characters’ sexual preferences from time to time. Be sure to include any and all bizarre fetishes too. Got a gay character? Emphasize on at least every other panel that he enjoys wearing girly clothing and other men. If that doesn’t get you enough hits try looking on DA for the latest anime trends…like inflation!

      • Sin D'Angelo replied:

        I agree!

        #35 When drawing manga style, make sure to NOT study the human anatomy AT ALL WHATSOEVER. Drawing from life will only lead to discouragement. Remember to only draw faces in two directions- diagonal-left and crudely-drawn profiles. When coloring, be sure to cram every color of the rainbow into one character o attract attention! Study anime such as Dragon Ball Z for men’s anatomy, and Pokemon for females. You’ll find copying other artists’ styles will lead you on the path to perfectly proportioned humans!

  27. bufko replied:

    I’fe don anithing you say but in german and im shure it will pay out greatley! cant waits for all the money to come. thank yo!!!111111

    No, really, thanks for this entertaining article, loved it :)

    Also, Hazmatt’s “#17. Remember, “you’re an idiot” is a perfectly acceptable punchline. ” is pure gold ^^

  28. EQComics replied:

    This list is just grand. Without offending my webcomic peers who might do this, the “Donations” button has always been a little off-putting to me. I don’t want to land on a site and be immediately asked (even nicely) to give them money.

    And when they hold their comic for ransom (i.e., donation goals to release the next comic), that’s just awful.

  29. Jason Carvarel replied:

    Hey guys, if you didn’t see it, check this post:
    http://heylookcomics.wordpress.com/2009/09/26/more-webcomic-tips/
    for some information about more tips! Thanks a bunch!

  30. Tweetics: A comic about Tweets - To The Vatican #3 replied:

    [...] was reading a mock list for Webcomic beginners a few weeks back and I began to really think about the #33 that another author had put on that list [...]

  31. drew mclarry replied:

    Yeah the internet sucks and all those stick men drawing wannabe cartoonists are gonna keep on filling it with meaningless strips that are about as funny as catching your weener in your zipper.Bah Humbug

  32. AeradaNasi replied:

    i like #12… and #35 xD

  33. kingrandom replied:

    wasn’t sure wheteher to believe it or not at first. Realise I’ve done some of thos things. oops!

  34. kingrandom replied:

    I correct grammar:
    wasn’t sure whether to believe it or not at first. I realise that I’ve done some of those things. Oops!

  35. Kenny Bristow replied:

    Who cares? Check this out! http://www.gocomics.com/mad-mouse

  36. vwyler replied:

    The original list was funny, but some of the additions made by posters seem more like personal griping rather than genuine reverse logic advice.

  37. texasroadstew replied:

    Do whatever you want.

  38. Jeff Beckman (@beckmanimation) replied:

    This actually took me longer than it should have to realize it was sarcastic! I was beginning to be very disappointed, then I came to my senses, great tips!

  39. Josh Beswick replied:

    I read most of it all the way up to 14 mildly thinking “eh, this is kind of fishy.. I might not do that.. Don’t put comics on the front page? That’s inconvenient.. COPY? Maybe mix and match styles you enjoy and make them your own. Don’t tell your fans you’re going on vacation? Eh, sounds like a dick move.. but it could be true.. lol”. The second I got to COMIC SANS I knew something was up and instantly scrolled down to the comments to see what everyone was saying. lol Should I be ashamed of how long it took me to realize?

    Number 1 and 2, if reworded, are kind of good points. I think it’s better to not get hung up over how high of quality your comic is in the beginning. I mean, a lot of big web comics started out looking rather bad.. and I often see animations/comics that are popular and think to myself “the hell, I could do that.” The difference between them and me is they’re DOING it.. and I’m not.

  40. michaelgrills replied:

    I was looking around the internet trying to figure out how to make my webcomic better and came across this. I was seriously concerned I was already in trouble until point 3.

    Then I realized how funny you were being and started all over. I enjoyed every point.

    Great post. I’m glad I found it.

  41. shychotic replied:

    I will take this awesome advice to heart,
    My new webcomic will be a badly drawn mishmash so that no one can read it :P

    Yes I am starting one, dont worry, it will be structured and badass :D

  42. Website replied:

    Why viewers still make use of to read news papers when in this technological world everything
    is presented on web?

  43. Firefly~ replied:

    really helpful!! ive been wanting to make a webcomic for a while, and this really helped! :3

  44. gay bear replied:

    cool ideas!

  45. comic replied:

    good post. good blog. thanks.

  46. michael replied:

    great lets put x rated stuff and ads on our comics so it can screw our kids up like us. No More Brainwashing for the youth!!!!

  47. Watch Anime replied:

    It’s hard to come by knowledgeable people in this particular subject, however, you seem like you know what you’re talking about! Thanks

  48. Watch Anime replied:

    An interesting discussion is worth comment. I do believe that you need to write more on this subject matter, it may not be a taboo matter but usually folks don’t discuss such issues. To the next! Best wishes!!

  49. newbies replied:

    There’s certainly a lot to learn about this subject. I love all the points you made.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback URI

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: